So Much Time, So Little To Do

Anish Kapoor’s ‘Leviathan’ May 13, 2011 - By Bobby Solomon - Category: Art


Currently in the middle of the Grand Palais des Champs-Elysees is the biggest blog you’ll probably ever see. It was created by famous British sculptor Anish Kapoor, who you might know from his sculpture Cloud Gate, or better know as The Bean. What you see above is called Leviathan, a 115 foot high sculpture which is made of PVC stretched over a giant, metal frame. The structure is so large in fact that you can walk around inside of it’s four, blobby arms. He says of the sculpture that he hopes that “people will be invited to enter the artwork to immerse themselves in its color and it will be, I hope, a contemplative, poetic experience.”  I personally think the sculpture is beautiful, especially because it’s sitting in the Grand Palais. The two structures couldn’t be more different, and there’s something interesting about that juxtaposition. The simplicity of Leviathan and the way the light shines on (and through) it really makes the Grand Palais shine. Although the photos from inside of Leviathan remind of a digestive tract, which if you’ve read this you probably won’t be able to unsee… sorry about that.  Bobby

Anish Kapoor’s ‘Leviathan’ May 13, 2011 - By Bobby Solomon - Category: Art

Currently in the middle of the Grand Palais des Champs-Elysees is the biggest blog you’ll probably ever see. It was created by famous British sculptor Anish Kapoor, who you might know from his sculpture Cloud Gate, or better know as The Bean. What you see above is called Leviathan, a 115 foot high sculpture which is made of PVC stretched over a giant, metal frame. The structure is so large in fact that you can walk around inside of it’s four, blobby arms. He says of the sculpture that he hopes that “people will be invited to enter the artwork to immerse themselves in its color and it will be, I hope, a contemplative, poetic experience.” I personally think the sculpture is beautiful, especially because it’s sitting in the Grand Palais. The two structures couldn’t be more different, and there’s something interesting about that juxtaposition. The simplicity of Leviathan and the way the light shines on (and through) it really makes the Grand Palais shine. Although the photos from inside of Leviathan remind of a digestive tract, which if you’ve read this you probably won’t be able to unsee… sorry about that. Bobby

— 2 years ago with 12 notes
#Anish  #Kapoor  #Leviathan 
  1. itsspelledjon posted this